Books, Weekly Lists

Weekly Lists #11: Favourite Childhood Classics

Every Wednesday, I post a list of random stuff. This week: 5 “classics of children’s literature” – that I really, really loved…

This post is not sponsored in any way or form. It does, however, contain affiliate links.

1. Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

 


Although I’ve read, enjoyed and currently own all 4 books within this series, the first book is the one that has stuck with me most. My grandparents had an abridged children’s version of it, and I read it so often when I was at their place, that they eventually just decided to give it to me.
The original version is just as dear to me as the abridged one which first introduced me to this book, and it has the huge advantage of having an excellent movie-adaptation (starring Winona Ryder) which I watch just about each Christmas period.

2. The Railway Children, by E. Nesbit


I first read this book when I was about 14 – I was sick, bored, and my dad brought it home for me from the library, saying he used to love this book as well. I read it, fell in love with it, have re-read it about 20 times since then, and I still have to grow tired of it!

 

3.Black Beauty, by Anna Sewell


I was first introduced to this book through the television series which was based on it, so when I came across the books in our library, I just knew I had to read it. There’s a certain melancholy to this story which just gets me every single time I re-read it, and the story is just beautiful…

4. Peter Pan, by J.M. Barrie


Another eternal classic for children, my love for this book actually started after seeing the film-adaptation in cinemas in 2003. I was ten at the time, and as far as I can remember it was only the second time ever I went to see a movie in the cinema – I left the cinema crying because “it was just so beautiful” (this is an expression I actually use to this day, to the exasperation of my parents, sisters, and others who have seen me ugly-cry while uttering it, emotionally shattered due to a book or movie). My dad then gave me his old copy of it, and I’ve read every version I can get my hands on ever since…

5. Mary Poppins, by P.L. Travers


Although I’d already seen the Disney movie based on this character numerous times, I didn’t actually pick up the book until after I’d seen the film based on the life of the author. The character in the book is, of course, quite less sugar-sweet than the one in the movie (it’s Disney after all, everything gets numerous spoonfuls of sugar), but I found myself really enjoying the story. I haven’t gotten around to reading the other books in the series yet, but they are definitely on my tbr-list!

So, there you have it: 5 of my favourite classics of the ‘broad field’ that is children’s literature! How about you? What are some of your favourite classics aimed at children? Which ones did I miss? Let me know below!
-Saar